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Statement of Intent 2010-2013

Contents

Introduction: Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage

This document outlines the priorities of the Ministry for Culture and Heritage for the next three years. It reflects discussions I have had with the Chief Executive about my expectations of the role the Ministry will play in advancing and managing the Government’s interests in the cultural sector.

The document reflects the Government’s conviction that culture is important, not only because of its intrinsic value, but because it can be a force for innovative development, economic growth and for social improvement.

Culture must prove it provides value for taxpayer money. There are bold cultural initiatives to be pursued in the future, but they depend on making best use of government funding and the establishment of new sources of support for culture. Organisations within the sector need to work effectively together to maximise efficiency and to identify the new approaches that might be necessary.

Hon. Chris Finlayson
Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage

 

Statement of Responsibility
I am satisfied that the information on the future operating intentions provided by my department in this Statement of Intent is in accordance with sections 38, 40 and 41 of the Public Finance Act 1989 and is consistent with the policies and performance expectations of the government.

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Introduction: Chief Executive, Ministry for Culture and Heritage

I’m pleased to present the Ministry’s 2010–2013 Statement of Intent. This Statement will guide my organisation over the coming period as we make decisions that will help shape the way New Zealanders experience their culture and the way the country is perceived overseas.

Many of these decisions we will arrive at in consultation with key sector agencies. The Ministry is a small organisation, responsible for supporting government’s engagement in a complex and dynamic sector: we cannot be successful if we do not work effectively with the other cultural organisations that have a connection with the Ministers responsible for Arts, Culture and Heritage, Broadcasting, and Sport and Recreation. The Ministry is developing a better sense of desirable sectoral outcomes, and the roles that this organisation, Crown entities and other cultural bodies might play.

The importance of such an approach has informed the development of this document. I am confident that it will provide a good basis for the work we do, and for the provision of effective support to our Ministers.

Lewis Holden
Chief Executive
Ministry for Culture and Heritage

 

Statement of Responsibility
In signing this statement, I acknowledge that I am responsible for the information contained in the Statement of Intent for the Ministry for Culture and Heritage. This information has been prepared in accordance with the Public Finance Act 1989. It is also consistent with the proposed appropriations set out in the Appropriations (2010/11 Estimates Bill), as presented to the House of Representatives in accordance with section 13 of the Public Finance Act 1989, and with the existing appropriations and financial authorities.

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Nature and Scope of the Ministry's Operations

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage is responsible to the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage, the Minister of Broadcasting and the Minister for Sport and Recreation. Our role is to provide advice to Government for the cultural, broadcasting and sports sectors, to assure Ministers of the performance of funded organisations, to provide leadership to the cultural sector, and to deliver quality cultural products and services.

What we do

Our services (or “outputs”) include:

  • policy advice to Government on funding, legislation and programmes
  • producing high-quality history, heritage and reference products and services for New Zealanders, visitors and international audiences
  • research, development, advice and advocacy for the cultural sector
  • supporting the board appointment process, and developing governance and operational capability within the sector
  • administering government funding and monitoring the performance of funded cultural organisations.

Who we work with

As well as Ministers and funded cultural organisations from the cultural sector, the Ministry works with central and local government organisations to achieve the cultural objectives of their policies, products or services. We collaborate with or advise organisations that have policies affecting the sector, and provide them with, for example, project leadership; this includes organisations such as Te Puni Kokiri, the Department of Conservation, Archives New Zealand, and the Ministry of Economic Development.

The funding we administer, and the cost of our operations

In 2010/11 the Ministry will administer total appropriations of:

  • $295.118 million for Vote Arts, Culture and Heritage (which includes broadcasting)
  • $64.147 million for Vote Sport and Recreation.

The cost of the Ministry’s operations in 2010/11 is:

  • $6.129 million for Policy Advice and Monitoring of Funded Agencies
  • $7.575 million for Heritage Services
  • $2.090 million for the Cultural Diplomacy International Programme
  • $98,000 for providing Purchase Advice and Monitoring of Sports and Recreation Crown Entities.

The Cultural Dividend for New Zealand

Culture benefits New Zealand and New Zealanders both directly and indirectly. These benefits in turn motivate New Zealanders’ continued participation in their culture, and reinforce the development of a thriving cultural sector. Further, the more New Zealanders value their culture, the more they will participate as producers and consumers.

New Zealand’s economic development: Our cultural industries make a substantial economic contribution. In 2007 they accounted for $12.4 billion in sales of goods and services and $3.1 billion in added-value to the economy. In 2006 they employed 126,531 people. The cultural sector has increased consumer income and jobs locally, and this indicates that New Zealanders are increasing their participation in culture and cultural activities.

Increased innovation: Creativity fuels innovation, which is essential to shaping a modern economy. Through innovation we develop the intellectual property, design concepts, and new forms of delivery that provide jobs and income for New Zealand. Innovation breeds talent, skills and education, which in turn is reflected in productivity. Stimulating the creative and innovative production of goods and services pays.

Thriving communities: A thriving culture matters for our communities. Vibrant and diverse communities demonstrate the tolerance, shared values and freedom of expression that drive creativity and innovation. Vibrant and creative communities also offer quality cultural experiences that enable New Zealand to take advantage of tourist opportunities such as the Rugby World Cup.

Stronger identity: New Zealanders value their culture as important to their identity. A majority believe that cultural activities improve their quality of life (61%) and help develop a stronger sense of identity (53%). A majority also believe that Maori culture is an important part of our national identity (62%) and that the protection of our heritage is important nationally (82%). A clear sense of identity defines New Zealand and helps us project ourselves on the world stage. An important foundation for identity is an understanding of New Zealand’s heritage.

Figure 1: Drivers of a thriving cultures

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Overall, a thriving cultural sector provides significant artistic, economic and social benefits for New Zealanders. The long-term goal for the cultural sector is therefore:

Stimulating the drivers of a thriving culture (see Figure 1) helps increase culture’s direct and indirect contributions to New Zealand. These drivers are the foundation for the sector and Ministry outcomes.

A thriving culture reflects the collective activities of all cultural participants (such as producers, funders, communities and Maori) across New Zealand. These activities and participants are a focus for the Government’s efforts to stimulate the drivers of a thriving culture. The Government’s investment in culture and sport focuses on:

  • protecting our important heritage
  • supporting the production, consumption, participation and appreciation of local cultural goods, services and broadcasting content
  • increasing New Zealanders’ participation and performance in sport.

In 2007/08, total funding for cultural organisations (excluding broadcasting) from local and central government was $308.5 million, with central government contributing 55% of this. Funding to cultural organisations from non-central (for instance, State-owned Enterprises) or local government sources was $74.6 million. 197 organisations received some local government support and 128 organisations received support from central government.

Strategic Direction

Increasing New Zealand’s cultural dividend

This section outlines the strategic direction for the Ministry and the cultural sector. It also outlines the challenges we face, and explains how we support the Government’s policies and measure our progress.

The Government’s goal is to lift the long-term performance of the economy. An innovative, efficient and coordinated cultural sector will be well positioned to contribute to and benefit from an improving economy.

Focus and drivers of our strategic direction for 2010–2013

The Ministry’s strategic direction for 2010–2013 focuses on:

  • improving the viability of Government-funded cultural organisations
  • delivering value-for-money services to the Government
  • improving the positioning and effectiveness of the portfolio, and expanding the leadership the Ministry provides in developing policy and within the cultural sector
  • increasing the visibility of culture’s artistic, economic and social contribution
  • partnering with other agencies to advance the contribution that Maori and Maori culture make to the sector.

The foundation for our strategic direction is:

  • the Government’s key policy objectives and priorities for the cultural, broadcasting and sport portfolios (summarised in Figure 2)
  • providing value for money from the Government’s investment in the sector
  • the sector’s long-term goal
  • the medium-term outcomes for the sector.

The sector goal, “A thriving culture – succeeding artistically, economically and socially”, is progressed through three outcomes that are advanced by addressing the key drivers of a thriving culture (Figure 1):

  • thriving producers and healthy cultural and sports organisations (Create). This outcome focuses upon the key drivers – participation and viable cultural organisations
  • increased preservation of New Zealand’s culture, heritage and traditions (Preserve). This outcome focuses upon the key drivers – preservation and protection of our heritage.
  • New Zealanders increasingly valuing their arts, broadcasting, culture, heritage or sport (Value). This outcome focuses upon the key consumption drivers availability (coverage), appreciation and valuing culture and cultural activities.

Figure 2: Government policy objectives and portfolio priorities

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The links between the Government’s priorities, the sector’s goal and outcomes, and the key results (impacts) of the Ministry’s services are summarised in Figure 3: Strategy map

Challenges

The key challenges for the Ministry in its work with the wider cultural sector are:

  • sustaining the performance of funded cultural organisations in a constrained fiscal environment
  • increasing coordination and cohesion in a diverse sector
  • maximising the effectiveness and benefits of arts, heritage and broadcasting policies in the face of rapidly changing technologies and audience behaviour
  • coordinating an increasing range of policies, agencies and programmes across Government in the areas of arts, heritage and media.

Improving Performance

In 2010/11 we will continue our focus on three Ministry-wide performance improvement actions:

  • improving the positioning and effectiveness of the arts, culture and heritage, and broadcasting portfolios
  • expanding the Ministry’s policy and sector leadership and focusing the monitoring of funded organisations on improving performance and effectiveness
  • enhancing the Ministry’s structure and flexibility.

These initiatives contribute to the Government’s policy objective of lifting the performance of the public service. Details are contained in the Ministry’s output plans. Progress with these initiatives is reported in six-monthly output plan reports and in the annual report.

Figure 3: Strategy map

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Measuring Progress

Progress towards sector outcomes

We use key outcome indicators to track overall progress towards the sector’s and the Ministry’s outcomes. We are particularly interested in the strength and sustainability of changes in the indicator trends. Figure 4 summarises the trends for specific indicators. In general, the aim for the sector is to maintain those indicator trends that are improving and to develop those that are not; this will be a key challenge in the current constrained fiscal climate. A further challenge will be supporting cultural organisations so that they are able to capitalise on opportunities as economic conditions improve.

These indicators should be interpreted as medium to long-term trends for two reasons:

  • progress on these indicators is not limited to the sector and the Ministry’s efforts alone
  • the statistical base for this information is wide. It includes cultural activity that is linked to activities from other producers such as local authorities. New Zealand-wide information is essential for targeting our services and providing high-quality cultural policy advice.

This is the first year we have included detailed outcome indicators in our Statement of Intent, and 2010 will be the baseline year for ongoing reporting. We will refine these outcome indicators over time, and report changes in our annual report.

Effectiveness and efficiency of the Ministry’s operations

The Ministry’s contribution to the sector outcomes is measured in two ways:

  • the Ministry’s effectiveness is measured by using the medium-term impacts (results) for its key services (including relevant measures of cost effectiveness)
  • its efficiency is measured by using service performance measures and standards.

Measuring our effectiveness and efficiency helps us assess whether we are providing value for money. For details of the Ministry’s impact measures, see the following section, Ministry’s services and intended results. Service performance measures for 2010 are reported in the Information Supporting the Estimates of Appropriations. Annual changes in the Ministry’s impact and service performance measures are reported in our Annual Report.

Figure 4: Trends in outcome indicators

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Ministry’s services and intended results

This section describes the services we deliver and the results we intend to achieve. Figure 5 illustrates those services, showing the outcomes that each service contributes to; it also shows the costs of our services for 2010. These services support the Government’s cultural policies and sector outcomes, and the key drivers of a thriving culture.

Some of the Ministry’s services support all outcomes – for example, policy advice while other services are linked to a specific outcome.

The Ministry’s work programme in this document covers both:

  • key services to New Zealanders and Ministers
  • sector-focused initiatives.

Figure 5: Ministry services

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OUTCOME 1: Thriving producers and healthy cultural and sports organisations (Create)

Outcome 1 focuses upon two key drivers of a thriving culture – the production of cultural information and experiences, goods and services, and the viability of cultural and sports organisations.

Key services

The Ministry’s services for this outcome (detailed in Figure 5) include:

  • supporting the development of a sustainable cultural sector
  • funding and supporting the development of healthy cultural and sports organisations
  • producing digital and non-digital cultural information resources
  • supporting board appointment processes
  • providing policy advice to the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage and the Minister of Broadcasting, and purchasing advice to the Minister for Sport and Recreation.

Those services also support:

  • the Government’s portfolio priorities: sustainable public broadcasters; competition for quality in broadcasting; improved viability of funded organisations; and lifting the performance of the public sector
  • aspects of Outcome 2 (the preservation of New Zealand’s heritage) and of Outcome 3 (audience appreciation of cultural content, and participation in sport and recreation opportunities).

The Appropriations for Outcome 1 are:

  • Heritage Services
  • Policy Advice and Monitoring of Funded Organisations.

Work programme for Outcome 1

Ministry's Key Services Key sector-focused initiatives
Producing and publishing (digital and non-digital) resources on New Zealand and its culture and society (eg. Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand)

Producing historical information for schools and New Zealanders (see also Outcome 2)

Implementing the recommendations of the Cultural Philanthropy Taskforce
Supporting funded agencies in improving their viability and measuring their performance Implementing the reviews of the Arts Council of New Zealand Toi Aotearoa Act, the Historic Places Act and the NZ Film Commission

Reviewing the arrangements for the Government’s support for contemporary popular music

Expanding the engagement with Maori and the focus on Maori culture in the Ministry (for example, bilingual websites) Broadcasting: Managing the transition to digital television; developing the policy settings for sustainable public broadcasters; effective contestable funding; improving the transparency of the production and delivery of content; giving TVNZ the flexibility to adapt to a changing market

Results (impacts)

In delivering services and initiatives for Outcome 1, we aim to achieve these results:

Ministry’s key services

  • More New Zealanders who are better informed about their country, history, culture and society

Sector initiatives

  • Value for money public funding in the sector
  • More philanthropic investment in the sector
  • Public broadcasters successfully adapting to a converging market and producing a greater range of cultural content
  • Viable, well governed cultural and sports organisations
  • Arts, culture and heritage organisations producing a greater range of cultural activities
  • The increasing visibility of the benefits of Maori culture.

Demonstrating success

For Ministry services For sector and Ministry outcomes
The Ministry will know its services are achieving their intended results when there is: We will know the sector is collectively progressing this outcome when:
An increasing range of Ministry-produced reference resources (eg. Te Ara – The Encyclopedia of New Zealand) being used by more users more often. Performance: 2010 target: 2.5 million visitors There are more producers, they are prospering, and there is a greater range and quality of cultural information, goods, services and local broadcasting content. Performance measures: outcome indicators – change in goods and services and locally produced
Sustained cost effectiveness of the Ministry’s reference (and history) websites. Cost effectiveness relates to the unit-cost of producing online history and reference resources relative to the number of visitors (see the note “Cost effectiveness” below). Directly funded cultural and sports organisations are effective and financially viable. Performance measures: effective governance and financial management; services achieving targets
Continued Ministerial satisfaction that the Ministry’s monitoring of funded cultural organisations’ performance and its support for the development of governance and capability within the sector is high-quality and improves the organisations’ performance Ministers are confident that funded cultural organisations are well governed, effective and efficient.
Increased philanthropic investment in the sector. Performance measure: benchmark to be set 2010.

For more information about outcome indicators, see Figure 3.

Cost effectiveness: The information for measuring cost effectiveness comes from both the Te Ara and NZHistory websites (see Outcome 2 for history resources). Assessing cost effectiveness is most relevant where the number of visitors and the level of engagement are significant. We use data such as costs, number of visits, and the visitor experience (number of pages viewed is a proxy measure for the visitor experience) in assessing the trend in cost effectiveness. The estimated performance of measures contributing to cost effectiveness for 2009 is: Average visits (of both sites): up 22%; Average page views (of both sites): up 14%; Costs: up 4.05 %. From this we conclude that our digital services are a cost effective service for achieving more New Zealanders who are better informed about their heritage, country and society.

OUTCOME 2: Increased preservation of New Zealand’s culture, heritage and traditions (Preserve)

Outcome 2 focuses on the increased preservation of our heritage and traditions as a key driver of a thriving culture.

Key services

The Ministry’s services for this outcome (detailed in Figure 5) cover:

  • the protection, recording, education, preservation and accessibility of New Zealand’s heritage
  • policy advice on the preservation of our heritage
  • the capital funding and management of regional museum and heritage assets.

Those services also support:

  • the Government’s policy goal of improved education and skills
  • some aspects of Outcome 3 (New Zealanders valuing their heritage)
  • the heritage protection activities of other organisations from the cultural sector (such as Te Papa, the NZ Film Archive and the NZ Historic Places Trust).

The Appropriations for Outcome 2 are:

  • Heritage Services
  • Policy Advice and Monitoring of Funded Organisations
  • Other Expenses: Regional Museums.

Work programme for Outcome 2

Ministry’s key services Key sector-focused initiatives
Producing historical information for schools and New Zealanders (New Zealand History online, oral histories, history publications) Promoting commemorations
Implementing best practices for the effective management of heritage resources Administering funding for the capital infrastructure of regional museums
Administering legislation to protect symbols of nationhood and movable and found cultural heritage Reviewing the arrangements for Government’s support for objects and collections of national importance
Maintaining access to memorials and other places of national significance Reviewing the arrangements for Government’s support for audio-visual archiving

Results (impacts)

In delivering services and initiatives for Outcome 2, we aim to achieve these results:

Ministry’s key services

  • More historical resources
  • Increased efficiency and effectiveness of the management of cultural heritage
  • Symbols of national identity are protected and promoted
  • Memorials and places of national significance are maintained and accessible.

Sector initiatives

  • More New Zealanders are better informed about significant commemorations
  • Museum collections are preserved and accessible.

Demonstrating success

For Ministry services For sector and Ministry outcomes
The Ministry will know its services are achieving their intended results when there is: We will know the sector is collectively progressing this outcome when there is:
An increasing range of Ministry-produced history resources (eg. NZHistory online) being used by more users more often. Target 2010: 800,000 visitors

Sustained cost effectiveness of the Ministry’s history (eg. NZHistory online) website. Cost effectiveness relates to the unit-cost of producing online history and reference resources relative to the number of visitors (see the note “Cost effectiveness” under Outcome 1 above).

More of New Zealand’s heritage resources (places, film, taonga, content etc) being identified for preservation. Performance measures: outcome indicators – identified stock of heritage to be preserved; heritage stock lost; percentage of collections preserved; percentage of sites maintained and accessible

An increased uptake of heritage management standards; an improved performance against good practice standards. Target: benchmark to be established in 2010

An increasing number of heritage resources being conserved to relevant standards. Performance measure: percent of stock meeting preservation or storage standards

Compliance with the requirements of the Protected Objects Act; quantity and type of movable heritage and taonga tuturu protected. Performance 2009: 100%; Target 2010: 100%
Increased numbers of visitors to the National War Memorial. 2008/9 Performance: 14,050 visitors

Positive visitor perceptions of the National War Memorial experience. Target 2010: sustain

For more information about outcome indicators, see Figure 3.

OUTCOME 3: New Zealanders increasingly valuing their arts, heritage, broadcasting, and sport (Value)

Outcome 3 focuses on New Zealanders valuing a thriving culture as shown by the increased consumption of cultural and sports activities. This outcome is advanced by increasing the coverage and range of cultural and sports activities and increasing the appreciation and consumption of those activities.

Key services

The Ministry’s services for this outcome (detailed in Figure 5) cover the promotion, consumption, appreciation and valuing of arts, broadcasting, culture and heritage, and sporting activities. These services also support the Government’s policy objective of improved education and skills.

The Appropriations for Outcome 3 are:

  • International Cultural Diplomacy (CDIP)
  • Heritage Services
  • Policy Advice and Monitoring of Funded Organisations.

Also linked to Outcome 3 are the arts, heritage and broadcasting policy initiatives for Outcome 1 and the operations of arts, heritage and broadcasting funded cultural organisations.

Work programme for Outcome 3

Ministry’s key services Key sector-focused initiatives
Increasing the awareness of New Zealand among international audiences (CDIP) Exposure of New Zealand’s culture during the Rugby World Cup 2011
  Increasing the use of promotional resources and cultural event information
  Broadcasting: Developing the policy settings for an increased range of cultural content being enjoyed by more audiences

Results (impacts)

In delivering services and initiatives for Outcome 3, we seek to achieve these results:

Ministry’s key services

  • An increased awareness of New Zealand among international audiences (CDIP)

Sector initiatives

  • The maximising of visitors’ enjoyment of and exposure to New Zealand’s culture during the Rugby World Cup 2011
  • An increased range of cultural broadcasting content being enjoyed by more audiences in different ways
  • Increased access to promotional resources and to information about cultural events

Demonstrating success

For Ministry services For sector and Ministry outcomes
The Ministry will know its services are achieving their intended results if: We will know the sector is collectively progressing this outcome if there is:
Approved projects are completed: Performance 2009: 100%; 2010 target: 100%

There is an increased range of media coverage of CDIP-funded initiatives

Increased audiences, attendance and use of online cultural resources

An increase in cultural tourism activity and in related revenue from the Rugby World Cup.

  Increasing numbers of users of cultural event information
  Growth in audiences and increased appreciation of broadcasting content
  Sustained audience interest, participation and satisfaction with arts, cultural, heritage and sporting activities
  Increased awareness of New Zealand and its culture in key regions overseas

For more information about outcome indicators, see Figure 3.

Managing in a changing environment

We anticipate changes in the Ministry’s and the sector’s operating environment by:

  • an annual forward-looking scan of trends
  • regularly reviewing our priorities and progress with Ministers
  • allocating resources to address changing requirements
  • carrying out targeted strategic research
  • monitoring cultural policies and trends in other countries.

By tracking changes in the operating environment, the Ministry can deliver a timely response to these changes. This also contributes to improving the cultural sector’s confidence in our leadership.

Key trends

In our 2009 Statement of Intent we identified several trends that influence our operations. We expect these trends to continue during 2010–13. They are:

  • Greater diversity in our population and communities – Increasing cultural and ethnic diversity, growing numbers of Pacific and Asian people, and an ageing population are boosting demand for greater diversity and customisation of cultural experiences. This provides opportunities for producing innovative cultural activities.
  • Fiscal restraint – The economy is still fragile and the fiscal climate is tight; this means that funding for artists and sporting and cultural organisations is limited, and this will constrain the development of high-quality local content. Services that focus on value for money, stimulating demand for cultural and sports activities, and viable organisations will continue to be important.
  • Increasing demand for history, culture and heritage experiences – There is a growing demand for information about New Zealand’s history, people, land, culture and heritage. It will be important that Ministry-produced resources reach a wider audience (particularly schools) and that national heritage sites are accessible.
  • Realising the potential of Maori – Maori culture is a key foundation for our national identity. The Maori population is growing, and more and more New Zealanders are gaining an appreciation of Maori culture. The involvement of Maori in sector policy and in funded cultural organisations will therefore be an important part of our strategic direction.
  • Greater visibility of New Zealand’s culture internationally – There are opportunities to promote New Zealand’s identity overseas and to advance diplomatic, cultural, and economic priorities in key regions and countries.
  • Rapidly changing digital technologies affecting arts, broadcasting, culture and heritage performance – As online and broadcasting technologies develop and the segmentation of audiences increases, there is likely to be greater demand for customized cultural content. The broadcasting environment is changing, and policies and processes must also develop to ensure a competitive, cost-efficient public broadcasting system. This is also the case for the arts and heritage sectors.

Effective and efficient delivery

This section covers how we continuously improve our service delivery, provide value for money, and manage risks. This activity contributes to the Government’s policy objective of lifting the performance of the public sector.

What we are seeking to achieve

The key objectives of our 2010 organisational development programme are:

  • increasing the flexibility of our service delivery and increasing the use of our capabilities
  • increasing the leadership we provide to the sector
  • increasing the involvement of Maori in our operations
  • improving our online systems and the reliability of our internal ICT
  • sustaining high levels of staff engagement
  • increasing our communication with sector organisations, stakeholders and audiences.

Work programme

The following are the priorities and key initiatives supporting our organisational development programme:

Priority Key Initiatives
Increasing the flexibility of our service delivery and increasing the use of our capabilities

Increasing the leadership we provide to the sector

Review our structure, and implement changes for 2010
Increasing the involvement of Maori in our operations Continue the delivery of Maori engagement programme (commenced 2009)
Improving online systems, and the reliability of internal ICT Implement common resource planning, project planning and risk management; implement internet platforms for the production of online cultural resources
Sustaining high levels of staff engagement Continue staff engagement (Gallup) survey; expand the professional development programme
Increasing communication with sector organisations, stakeholders and audiences Implement the Ministry’s communications strategy stakeholder appreciation survey

Demonstrating success

The overall success of our capability development is demonstrated by:

  • measures and targets for our key initiatives
  • organisation health and efficiency indicators.

Measures and targets for our key initiatives

These are:

  • maintain positive sector relationships
  • increase positive feedback on the quality of policy relationships
  • increase the use of internet sites, user length of time on Ministry websites, and feedback on content quality
  • increase our engagement with the sector (both the level of staff engagement, and feedback from the sector on our leadership and performance management)
  • maintain positive communication with the sector and positive feedback from stakeholders.

Organisation health and efficiency indicators

We use the following measures to monitor trends in our organisation health and efficiency:

Health Measures
Objective Indicator Performance
A responsive, productive and focused work culture Employee engagement rates 2008 – 3.7 out of 5
2009 – 4.03 out of 5
(79th percentile for participating public-sector entities)
Average length of service 2007 – 4.1 yrs
2008 – 3.8 yrs
2009 – 4.3yrs

Efficiency Measures
Indicator How used Performance
Staff cost per output Monitor the costs of producing outputs in relation to quality and resources required 2007 – $70,380
2008 – $80,456
2009 – $77,001
Ratio of staff full-time equivalent (FTE) engaged in output production to corporate support 2007 – 3.7:1
2008 – 3.2:1
2009 – 3.4:1
Personnel expenses per FTE 2007 – $78,442
2008 – $73,890
2009 – $81,675

Managing risks to performance

Using our risk management framework, we identify and manage risks to achieving Government priorities, sector outcomes and the delivery of value-for-money services. The risks most likely to affect our performance are:

Risk Risk management Indicator
Failure to maintain the quality of policy and monitoring advice and servicing of Ministers (All outcomes) Continued development of the Ministry’s strategic policy capability and its use of benchmarking and peer review Quality, quantity and timeliness of policy development; feedback from Ministers
Loss of reputation for reliability and accuracy of Ministry-developed digital resources (Outcome 1) Use of recognised external experts, internal checking and peer review in developing digital resources Feedback from audiences; use of resources by target audiences
Significant new performance issue(s) in a funded organization (Outcome 1) Delivery of best-practice guidance for Boards Early identification of risks and their management through agency reviews and effective monitoring plans Ministerial confidence in the performance of funded cultural organisations
Failure to understand or meet the requirements of users (Outcome 1) Increase engagement with users of the Ministry’s digital resources through its websites Feedback from users; use of resources by target audiences
Failure to maintain and develop effective networks and consultation (All outcomes) Continued monitoring of the flow of information to and from audiences and stakeholders
Regular engagement with the sector
Maori engagement initiative
Feedback from audiences
Major technology failure (Outcome 1) Systems for the management and development of digital resources
Effective project and risk management
Project delivery against plan; post-project review findings

Updated on 7th October 2019