National Erebus Memorial Project Updates 

22 February 2021

Construction to begin

Construction of the new memorial is expected to commence during the first week of March and will take approximately six months (works are scheduled to finish mid-October). The main contractor working onsite will be Naylor Love. Construction will take place between the hours of 7am – 5pm, Monday to Friday

You may notice increased activity at the park during construction, and detailed plans are in place to ensure any disruption is kept to a minimum. All works will be completed in line with the approved Resource Consent and Land-Owner Consent conditions.

The map below shows the construction site area of the memorial:

The first stage, scheduled to take 2-3 weeks, will consist of site set-up and include installation of secure fencing around the site and construction of a temporary access road within the park so tools and materials can be brought onsite. This road will be completely removed at the end of the memorial’s construction.

  • No car parks will be removed during the works.
  • The main road through the park will be impacted by large deliveries from time to time, for a short duration, in line with a Traffic Management Plan prepared by the main contractor.
  • A temporary access road through the park is being installed to protect sub-surface archaeology.
  • The contractor site area will include containers for the site office and staff facilities, and parking.

If you have any queries, please do get in touch as the team working on the memorial project will be very happy to speak with you. You can email [email protected] or phone (04) 499 4229.

Further FAQs about construction are available on our website.


8 December 2020

Landowner approval granted

On 17 November, the Waitematā Local Board considered the Ministry's landowner approval application for the construction of the National Erebus Memorial in Auckland's Dove-Myer Robinson Park. 

Staff from the Ministry, including chief executive Bernadette Cavanagh, and architect Nick Barratt-Boyes presented at the Board meeting. A number of family members who lost loved ones in the Erebus accident also attended, sharing their experiences and perspectives with the Board and members of the public also present.

After several hours of public submissions and debate, the Board voted 4-3 in favour of granting landowner approval. This decision effectively means that construction of the memorial can now begin.

The project team is now working to finalise the project plan and works schedule for the construction phase, which is expected to commence during the first half of 2021.


7 September 2020

Archaeological Authority granted

On 7 September, Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga granted an Archaeological Authority to the Ministry for Culture and Heritage for installation of the Memorial at the Dove-Myer Robinson site.

As part of the Archaeological Authority application an updated archaeological assessment was submitted to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga. This final assessment includes several additional mitigations to the Memorial design, to further ensure that the proposed works avoid or minimise impacts on the archaeological and heritage values of the site.


20 March 2020

Resource Consent Granted

The Ministry for Culture and Heritage was advised by Auckland Council yesterday that the resource consent for the National Erebus Memorial had been granted. This is a key milestone for the project. This decision was made by Independent Commissioner Ian Munro. 

Resource consent is one of three consents and approvals which the Ministry must obtain before the construction of the Memorial can get underway. The others are archaeological authority from Heritage New Zealand and approval from Waitematā Local Board who are the landowners of the proposed site Dove-Myer Robinson Park. The Ministry for Culture and Heritage continues to work through these important regulatory processes.


6 March 2020

Memorial resource consent will be non-notified

Auckland Council have advised that resource consent for the National Erebus Memorial will be non-notified. This decision was taken by an Independent Commissioner.  

The Commissioner has reviewed the Ministry’s application to build the memorial at Dove-Myer Robinson Park and was satisfied that no one would be adversely affected by the proposal and there will be no more than a minor impact on the park itself. This means the application can proceed on a non-notified basis.

The Ministry believes this decision reflects the thorough design process and planning approach followed for this project. The memorial has been designed to sit lightly on the landscape and enhance the surrounds of Dove-Myer Robinson Park.

The Commissioner has not yet made a decision on the resource consent itself.

Resource consent is one of three consents and approvals which the Ministry must obtain before the construction of the Memorial can get underway.  The others are archaeological authority from Heritage New Zealand and approval from Waitematā Local Board who are the landowners of the proposed site Dove-Myer Robinson Park.  The Ministry for Culture and Heritage continues to work through these important regulatory processes.

The Commissioner’s full decision is available on the Auckland Council website.


18 February 2020

Archaeological assessment reports now available

The archaeological assessment of the proposed site for the National Erebus Memorial in Dove-Myer Robinson Park is complete. A summary and the full reports are now available.


5 February 2020

Exploratory archaeological work complete

The exploratory archaeological work at proposed site of the National Erebus Memorial was completed as planned on Friday 31 January.  The project archaeologists are now finalising the report on their findings. This will be submitted to Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga as part of the Ministry’s application for archaeological authority to build on this site.

The full report will be published on the Ministry’s website in the next few weeks.


28 January 2020

Exploratory archaeological work planned for proposed National Erebus Memorial site

Before construction of the National Erebus Memorial can begin at the proposed site in Dove-Myer Robinson Park, Manatū Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage must gain an archaeological authority from Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

As part of this process, an archaeologist will be undertaking some exploratory work at the proposed site. This will determine whether there is anything of archaeological significance at the site which might affect the plans for the memorial.

This archaeological exploratory work is scheduled to take place on 31 January 2020. It is expected to take no more than one day.

The Ministry has consent from Auckland Council and Heritage New Zealand to undertake this work. This consent from Auckland Council is unrelated to landowner approval, which is also required before construction of the memorial can begin. The Ministry will submit an application for final landowner approval for Waitemata Local Board’s consideration once the resource consent and archaeological authority are in place. 

What is involved in the archaeological work?

An archaeologist will hand-dig a series of small test squares of no more than 0.5m2. These excavations will allow the archaeologist to further investigate several areas of potential interest identified during earlier testing on the site. Any archaeological evidence discovered will be recorded and re-covered with soil.  

The proposed site for the National Erebus Memorial is located on land likely to be associated with the late 19th or early 20th century landscaping works undertaken by Sir John Logan Campbell within the grounds of his property Kilbryde House, which was demolished in 1924.

The proposed temporary access road required for the memorial construction will run across the site of the Kilbryde house itself.  This road will be built up so as not to disturb the existing ground. Although no surface remains of the house have survived, earlier testing of the site indicated subsurface features (likely remnant foundations) may be present. The exploratory work currently underway will help establish the nature of these subsurface features.

The surrounding area is also significant to Ngāti Whātua o Ōrākei and Ngāti Paoa.

What happens then?

The results of this exploratory wok will form part of the Ministry’s application to Heritage New Zealand for an archaeological authority to build the National Erebus Memorial on the site at Dove-Myer Robinson Park.

Archaeological authority is one of three consents required before construction of the memorial can begin. The others are resource consent and landowner approval from Waitematā Local Board.


Quick Links


Updated on 22nd February 2021