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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Japan and New Zealand

    US and Japan sought a forum to guide the region’s rapid transformation. For most of the countries of ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Socialist bloc, the Middle East and New Zealand

    First, second and third worlds In the second half of the 20th century the principal Western economies, including Japan, accounted for most of the world’s trade and economic output, despite having only 20% of its population. The socialist bloc – the Soviet ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    China and New Zealand

    financial crisis of 1997 prompted a move towards regional associations. The ASEAN + 3 (APT) forum, which ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Introduction and impact of deer

    Acclimatisation The acclimatisation movement, which encouraged the introduction of plants and animals from other countries, was fashionable worldwide in the late 19th century. Many plants and animals were introduced to New Zealand, including more than 50 ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Impact on native plants

    Possums are voracious eaters – in New Zealand they consume an estimated 21,000 tonnes of vegetation a night. Most noticeably, they destroy spectacular flowering trees such as pōhutukawa and rātā. They also change the overall structure and composition of n ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    The development of forest research

    Early research Pre-European Māori investigated the medicinal properties of New Zealand’s native trees, and their suitability as building materials. Later, European explorers and botanists also researched native forests. Managing forest resources In the ea ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Researching native forests

    Native forest management New Zealand’s native forests were once abundant, but logging had depleted them. Native trees are slow to grow to maturity and so, to meet the continuing demand for wood, fast-growing exotic forests were planted, mainly by the stat ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Combating threats to forests

    Forest health With introduced trees came many new pests and diseases. From the 1920s the Forest Service was concerned that insect pests might come into the country on imported forest products, and lobbied for effective inspection and quarantine systems. I ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Identifying forest benefits

    Soil fertility Although plantation forests may exhaust soil nutrients, research in the South Island shows that the opposite can also be true. Exotic conifers have ectomycorrhizae (fungal associates) on their roots, which mobilise nutrients from organic ma ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Multi-purpose plantations

    The benefits of radiata pine plantations include providing shelter on farms, stabilising soil on erosion-prone hillsides, reducing the amount of sediment that ends up in rivers and streams, and absorbing water that could cause flooding. ‘Carbon sinks’ Bec ...

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