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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Arts and heritage

    important documents and archives. It also publishes books on local history. Artists and writers The region ... Kiwi halls in Featherston (built to serve soldiers training at nearby Featherston Military Camp during ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Leisure and sport

    The Wairarapa hosts many sporting and leisure activities, from athletics to wrestling. Popular leisure events include Summer Hummer (an outdoor music concert in February) and the Martinborough Fair in February and March. At a national level, Wairarapa is ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    Nelson is the largest urban area in the upper South Island, and also the name of the region to its south and west. The Nelson region includes the area administered by the Tasman District Council. To the east is Marlborough, and to the south and west is th ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Geology and landforms

    Geology Nelson’s limestones, marbles, granites, mudstones and ultramafic rocks are geologically part of rock groups found west of the Alpine Fault. These are quite diverse and complex compared to the greywacke mountains of the Southern Alps, east of the f ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Climate and environment

    A calm, sunny climate Nelson vies with Marlborough (and in some years Bay of Plenty) for the honour of having the country’s highest sunshine hours – and usually wins. One year the region recorded over 3,000 hours of bright sunshine, but the annual average ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    Māori history

    Nelson’s eight tribes Māori know the northern South Island as Te Tau Ihu (the prow) of the canoe of the demigod Māui. There are eight mutually recognised tribes in the Nelson–Marlborough region – Ngāti Kuia, Ngāti Apa and Rangitāne (Kurahaupō tribes), Ngā ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    European settlement

    Sealing gangs established seasonal camps at Toropuihi and Kahurangi on the west coast of the Nelson region from the early 1800s until the 1820s. Whalers came next, until the 1840s. They killed seals in the whaling off-season. New Zealand Company settlemen ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Sea and air transport and communications

    Sea transport From the 1840s Tasman Bay was Nelson’s main transport route. Small white sails dotted the bay as locally built vessels traded between Murderers’ Bay (Golden Bay) and the fledgling town of Nelson. Along Tasman Bay families of settlers took up ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Land transport

    Exploration European exploration was driven by a search for extensive grazing lands, for road routes to the West Coast and Canterbury, and for minerals. In 1842 the only suitable grazing land found by assistant surveyor John Cotterell was the Wairau valle ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Population and society

    Sparsely populated Nelson has never been heavily populated. In 2013 just 2.2% of New Zealand’s population (93,591) lived in the region. The Māori population before Pākehā settlement was probably only ever in the thousands. Nelson city’s early situation wa ...

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