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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Challenges: 1960s to 2000s

    From the 1960s, Manawatū’s economic and population growth slowed – as in other regions away from the main centres. Rural decline Rural areas virtually stopped growing. Dairy factories merged (most North Island processing is now carried out at a plant in H ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Population

    Manawatū: an average region? In 2013 Manawatū (including Palmerston North) had a population of just over 107,500. The 2013 census revealed an extraordinarily ‘ordinary’ Manawatū. On most indicators – age distribution, median income, income distribution, f ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Government

    Manawatū and Horowhenua formed part of Wellington province until 1876. Counties and boroughs A Manawatū county council was established in 1876 to administer the huge region between the Rangitīkei and Waikanae rivers. But the different areas, and town and ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Facts and figures

    Land area Manawatū and Horowhenua: 4,031 sq km New Zealand: 268,690 sq km Climate (Palmerston North) (National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research data, 1981–2010) Mean temperature, January: 17.8°C Mean temperature, July: 9.1°C Mean annual rainfal ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Leisure

    Early days The story of leisure in colonial Manawatū and Horowhenua echoes that of other parts of New Zealand – enthusiasm, shared by both Māori and Europeans, for horse racing; quickly organised games of cricket and later rugby; and informal gatherings o ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    Culture and heritage to 1940

    Māori traditions Cultural life in Manawatū and Horowhenua dates back to the oral traditions of the Rangitāne hapū (sub-tribes) and other iwi (tribes), which had settlements throughout the region. They passed on a rich lore linking their people to the land ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Culture and heritage since 1940

    Writing about the region George Petersen, Charlotte Warburton and Roy Clevely all published books ... stratification of that world in his short stories, most notably ‘It was so late’ (1946) – about a soldier ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Rapid change: 1870–1880

    A ‘heroic’ decade? Between the 1870s and 1910s there was greater change than the region had seen before, or has seen since. The first decade was particularly dramatic for Manawatū. In 1871 the Māori and Pākehā population was probably no more than 1,000 of ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    Wairarapa has a sense of space. If you arrive from Wellington by car, the zigzag road over the Remutaka Range offers glimpses of the plain below. At Featherston the hills part to reveal the land’s flatness and breadth. To the left are the blue-green peaks ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Boundaries and identity

    Wairarapa is shaped like a rectangle, about 130 kilometres long (from Palliser Bay north to Woodville) and 65 kilometres wide (from the Tararua and Remutaka ranges east to the coast). The Ngāti Kahungunu tribe’s boundary for the region is similar, stretch ...

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