Skip to main content

Search

  1. teara.govt.nz

    The Kermadec Ridge: submarine volcanoes

    The Kermadec section of the Pacific Ring of Fire is mostly submarine, extending over 1,400 kilometres between New Zealand and Tonga. Only the Kermadec Islands occur above sea level. Even these are the emergent caps of larger submarine volcanoes. Seafloor ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Central volcanic plateau

    The Ring of Fire The central North Island is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire – a term used for the rim of the Pacific Ocean, which has earthquakes and active volcanoes. Volcanic rocks poke through the greywacke sandstone. Volcanoes have been a feature he ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Inshore islands

    Mayor Island (Tūhua) Volcano lying offshore 28 km north-east of Waihī Beach and 35 km north of Tauranga Harbour entrance. The highest peak, Opuahau, is 355 m. The crater contains two lakes, Aroarotamahine (green) and Te Paritu (almost black). The island w ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    Manawatū and Horowhenua cover 4,000 square kilometres between the North Island’s main mountain range and the Tasman Sea. The region is bounded to the north by the Rangitīkei River and to the south by Kāpiti district. Manawatū occupies the northern part of ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Features of the landscape

    Mountains The eastern boundary of Manawatū and Horowhenua is the summit ridgeline of the Ruahine and Tararua ranges. These mountains are old greywacke blocks, like the ranges further north and the Southern Alps. Manawatū River The mountain ranges are sepa ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    Human impact on the environment

    The landscape in 1840 In 1840, when European colonisation began, forests covered the interior, and there were dunes, grassland and swamp on the coast. The most stable sand dunes were covered in mānuka, flax, toetoe, cabbage trees and bracken fern. Kahikat ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Early Māori history

    Tribes Before the 1820s the principal iwi (tribes) of the region were Rangitāne, Muaūpoko and Ngāti Apa. Rangitāne were found particularly in Manawatū, Muaūpoko in Horowhenua, and Ngāti Apa along the Rangitīkei River. Their traditions looked back to the A ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Māori and European newcomers, 1820–1870

    Invaders from the north In the 19th century the area between the Whanganui River and Kāpiti Island saw two large-scale human movements. 1820s: tribal migrations Armed parties of Ngāti Toa and Ngāti Raukawa from the Waikato region came into Manawatū and Ho ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Unsettled times: 1880–1910

    The Wellington–Manawatū railway Lack of money stopped work on the government’s Wellington–Manawatū railway in 1880. Wellington capitalists took over and largely financed the line, which operated from 1886. Crown land along the railway line was granted to ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Heyday: 1910s to 1960s

    By 1910 Manawatū, the district that came late in the story of Pākehā settlement, had equal standing with regions such as Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay, Whanganui and Southland. The economy was buoyant and in 1911 the Pākehā population had grown 40-fold since 1871 ...

Pages