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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Lifestyle and environment

    Lifestyle and environment affect health and are shaped by socio-economic factors. The material circumstances of people’s lives and the behavioural choices they make are influenced by things like income, employment status and education. Cancer Cancer has b ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Infectious diseases and immunisation

    Catching infections is part of growing up. Parents expect their children to get coughs and colds and common diseases like chickenpox, which about 90% of children catch (it is not part of the immunisation schedule). Bed rest and time off school and work (f ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Friendly societies and other fraternal organisations

    Beginnings Friendly societies, which provided financial help when a family’s male breadwinner suffered sickness, accident or death, emerged among British working men in the 18th century. The industrial revolution created a need for such societies. All at ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Cigarettes rule: 1900–1960

    During the Second World War, two days of the week were red-letter days for New Zealand soldiers, both at ... throat-burning fags with names like ‘Spitfire’ to each soldier. This satisfied them until the next day’s pay ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Risk factors

    The immediate risk factors for the major causes of death and disease in New Zealand men are well known and preventable: tobacco smoking, unhealthy diet, physical inactivity and excessive alcohol consumption. Tobacco use Tobacco use is the most readily pre ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    Health of New Zealand men

    Men’s health has been less widely discussed than women’s health – both professionally and by interest groups, in New Zealand and internationally. There has been a lack of attention to some important preventable causes of death and disease in New Zealand m ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Causes of men’s death, disease and injury

    Causes of death The leading cause of death for men in 2013 was heart disease, followed by stroke and lung cancer. The causes of death were in the same order as for women, but the rate of heart disease among men was almost twice that of women. Death rates ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Future prospects for men’s health

    Issues The health of New Zealand men is slowly improving, and is relatively high by international standards. Men’s health advocates argue that further improvements can be made through: encouraging people to stop smoking, and promoting non-smoking as the n ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Environmental health

    Sanitation and water In the 19th century poor public sanitation caused high death and illness rates from infectious diseases such as typhoid. Banning cesspits and installing sewers led to a reduction in these diseases. Treatment of drinking water followed ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Burials and cemeteries

    fewer markers for the dead. Lawns were provided for the scattering of ashes and memorial rose gardens ...

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