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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Expatriation to Britain

    director of Bloomsbury Publishing, which produced, among other things, the Harry Potter books. Performing ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Expatriation to other countries

    Although the attraction of Britain was strong, New Zealanders went to many other countries, Australia and the United States in particular. Australia Australia could be a destination or a stepping stone to some other country. In the 19th century New Zealan ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Attitudes to expatriation

    New Zealand ‘legends’ Expatriates who have achieved fame are revered by New Zealanders. Many national heroes – Katherine Mansfield, Ernest Rutherford and Frances Hodgkins, for instance – left New Zealand permanently in their youth. Websites such as NZ Edg ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    The early years, 1921 to 1932

    operators. Radio broadcasts first gained the attention of politicians not because of their content but ... Controls on broadcast content were also introduced. All content had to follow a strict moral code, ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    The state takes over – the 1930s

    State control – the NZBB versus the B stations In 1932 the Radio Broadcasting Company (RBC) was replaced by a government agency, the New Zealand Broadcasting Board (NZBB), which inherited the RBC’s stations. The number of stations and range of programmes ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    The golden age of radio, 1936 to 1960

    Radio personalities in the ‘golden age’ With the establishment of the commercial radio services, announcers’ names began to be used regularly on air. Until that time announcers were usually anonymous, as broadcasting authorities frowned on the idea of ‘ra ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    A turning point for radio – the legacy of the 1960s

    able to broadcast nationwide signals from Wellington. Increased national content meant reduced local ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    The rise of private radio, 1970s to 2010s

    of local content. All the national networks originated from Auckland. TRN was wholly owned by the ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Public and community radio from 1989

    local content: New Zealand-made programmes reflecting New Zealand identity and interests. The Kiwi Hit ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Māori, minority and student radio, 1960s to 2010s

    Māori radio The first iwi radio station, Te Upoko o te Ika in Wellington, officially began broadcasting in 1987. It was developed from the pioneering experimental Wellington station Te Reo o Poneke (1983–86). Māori gained wider access to broadcasting freq ...

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