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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Key population trends

    In the late 18th century the world was home to just under one billion people. By 2013 there were more than seven billion. New Zealand experienced an extreme version of this growth. Its population increased from barely 100,000 (Māori) people in 1769 (when ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Second World War and after

    Coast-watchers The outbreak of war in September 1939 brought new interest in the subantarctic. At the end of August the German cargo ship  Erlangen had left Port Chalmers for Australia to fill its bunkers with coal for the voyage home. When war was declar ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Ski racing

    The first ski races took place in New Zealand in the 1920s. Racing events became an important means of contact between ski clubs in early years. The first nationwide ski championships were held at Ruapehu in 1929, and competitions between New Zealand and ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Stilts

    The elegant stilts have slender necks and long legs to enable feeding in deep water. In flight their legs trail well beyond their tail. Black stilt Since the 1950s, the black stilt or kakī (Himantopus novaezelandiae) has been on the brink of extinction. B ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Migration within New Zealand

    As well as migrants to and from New Zealand, there are bird species that migrate within the country from one region to another. The estuaries and coastal sites that feed so many international wader visitors through the summer are used in winter by similar ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    A motorised society

    Car lovers New Zealanders love their cars. In 2005, with 607 cars for every 1,000 people, the country ranked third in the world for car ownership after Luxembourg (647) and Iceland (632). Of people aged over 18, 82% of New Zealanders owned cars, compared ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Sources of cars

    Countries of origin During the 1920s, brands from North America were the most popular vehicles – from 1925 to 1929, they provided 83% of new cars. Fords came from Canada and brands like Chevrolet from the US. Ford’s popularity was based on the Model T, wh ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Car imports and the assembly industry

    Tariffs and import licensing In 1907 the government introduced a 20% tariff (import tax) on cars that arrived in New Zealand already assembled, to protect local coachbuilders and car assemblers. The tariff was reduced to 10% during the First World War, an ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Demise of the car-assembly and component industries

    protection, and later with local content requirements for cars imported unassembled. Component manufacturers ... http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/ser/gentle-footprints-may06/html/page7.html (last accessed 15 April 2009). Back ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Motor services

    Car dealers Ford was one of the first car manufacturers to have a wide network of New Zealand dealers and distributors. There were 27 Ford agents in 1914, 42 in 1915, and 82 by 1929. Wellington company Rouse and Hurrell (later the Colonial Motor Company) ...

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