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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Outdoor recreation and leisure

    Horse sports and greyhounds Horse racing began early in the Whanganui region. In the 2010s, the Wanganui Jockey Club was one of the country’s oldest, and there was also a club in Waverley. Clubs formerly based in Marton and Bulls now hold their meetings a ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Buildings and heritage

    Koriniti and Pūtiki. Two books on marae in the region have been written by Morvin Simon of Kaiwhaiki. Māori ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Cultural life

    published several important New Zealand pictorial books. Over 500 sketches, oils and watercolours by ... River (1921). Other books on the river have also been produced, the latest by David Young in 1998. ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    The Volcanic Plateau stretches south-west from the Bay of Plenty coast to Mt Ruapehu in the central North Island. About 180 kilometres from the coast to the mountain, and 100 kilometres wide at most, it is bounded to the east by the North Island main rang ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Geology and climate

    An unstable land Beneath the Volcanic Plateau, the Pacific Plate has been sinking beneath the Australian Plate for the last 1.5 million years. This has led to intense heating, producing volcanic activity which has found its way to the earth’s surface. Vol ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    The changing landscape

    Early human impact People first settled on the Volcanic Plateau around the early 1300s. They burnt forest to clear land for cultivation, and by the 19th century the vegetation was mostly tussock, fern, mānuka and similar plants. Vegetation The forests tha ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Māori traditions – from Maketū to Tongariro

    People of Te Arawa The main tribes of the Volcanic Plateau are the Te Arawa people, in the Rotorua area, and Ngāti Tūwharetoa, around Taupō. The traditions of both groups link them to the Te Arawa canoe, which made its final landfall at Maketū on the Bay ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    War and peace – the 19th century

    The Volcanic Plateau tribes frequently visited coastal regions to gain access to food resources, and, from the 1820s, to trade with Europeans. Te Arawa in conflict Ngāpuhi war parties, armed with muskets and led by Hongi Hika, made destructive forays into ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Geothermal tourism and spas

    An intriguing landscape The Rotorua area was known early to Pākehā for its hot or thermal lakes, a stark contrast to the South Island’s cold lakes. Around the lakes were hot springs, geysers, mud pools, sulfurous steam, silica formations and volcanoes, al ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    An adaptable Māori culture

    In Rotorua especially, Māori interaction with Europeans has differed from that in other parts of the country. In other areas, contact was mainly through Māori doing seasonal work for Pākehā farmers, but in Rotorua it was mainly due to tourism. Reviving Mā ...

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