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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Plants and animals

    Plants Much of the King Country was covered by conifer–broadleaf forests prior to European settlement in the late 19th century. Māori knew the area as Te Nehe-nehe-nui (the great forest). The south-east was dominated by the tussock grasslands and alpine h ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Māori settlement and occupation

    Waka traditions The King Country has important associations with the Tainui waka (canoe), one of many which brought the ancestors of Māori to New Zealand from East Polynesia. Tainui, captained by Hoturoa, landed at Mōkau, where some of the crew disembarke ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Te Rohe Pōtae

    Māori control The government did not pursue the Māori king beyond the aukati (boundary), and no land within Ngāti Maniapoto territory was confiscated. These lands were largely off-limits to the government and settlers until the early 1880s. A small number ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    Population and society

    Significant European settlement of the King Country happened much later than in most other parts of New Zealand. It was one of the least accessible parts of the North Island, and had few settlers before it was closed to Europeans in the 1860s. The opening ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Farming, forestry and mining

    The government ‘opened’ land for farming settlements from the early 1890s. Much of this land was initially leased by Māori rather than sold. Māori also developed farms. Returned servicemen were settled on farms after both world wars. Farm types Pastoral f ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    Transport and infrastructure

    Rivers and sea As well as providing early Māori communities with food, rivers were major transport routes – the equivalent of modern-day highways. The Waipā River, a tributary of the Waikato River, provided access to the north and the Whanganui River gave ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Government and politics

    Early government During the period of provincial government (1853–76) most of the King Country was within the Auckland province. Parts of the southern and south-western areas were in Wellington and Taranaki provinces respectively. European settlers were v ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Tourism, recreation and sport

    Turnbull, whose books, manuscripts, photographs and paintings formed the basis of the Alexander Turnbull ... Maorilan d (1884). Later Turnbull wrote, ‘This was the first book of my collection’ 1 on the fly-leaf of ... the book, which is held by the eponymous library. The opening of Te Rohe Pōtae to Europeans in the ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Arts, culture and heritage

    appeared in his books Peter McIntyre’s New Zealand (1964) and Kakahi New Zealand (1972). Rangimārie Hetet ... history of the central and southern King Country, from 1980. The articles were collated in book form by ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    The Whanganui region lies between mountains and the sea. Dominating its northern boundary is Mt Ruapehu. To the north-west is the Matemateaonga Range, and to the north-east the Kaimanawa Mountains and the Kaweka and Ruahine ranges. Between the mountains a ...

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