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  1. teara.govt.nz

    Early years: 1960s and 1970s

    Te kōrero paki Kua roa te Māori e whakamiha ana ki te kōrero paki. I roto i te ao Māori, he tūranga rangatira tonu te kaikōrero. Ka whakamārama rātou i te ao mā roto mai i ā rātou kōrero. Ka whakarongo ngā taringa o te minenga ki a rātou e whakakōrero ana ...

  2. teara.govt.nz

    Beachcombing

    New Zealand’s long coastline acts like a net. Flotsam and jetsam borne on ocean currents fetch up on our shores. Flotsam is wreckage found floating on the sea, while jetsam is what is thrown overboard from passing ships and then washes ashore. The terms a ...

  3. teara.govt.nz

    Early settlers

    It is likely that the first settlers came to Taranaki about 1250–1300 CE. These migrants from eastern Polynesia found a heavily forested land, rich in natural resources. The earliest people Some of the early Māori settlements at the mouths of South Tarana ...

  4. teara.govt.nz

    The first New Zealand workshops

    New Zealand’s early industrial workshops were a wide range, from tailors through to umbrella-makers and pumice works. The most common types of workshops in 19th-century New Zealand were aerated-water manufacturers (the early version of modern soft-drink f ...

  5. teara.govt.nz

    Māori settlement

    Arrivals Waikato is the ancestral region of tribes descended from people who came to New Zealand on the Tainui waka (canoe) in the 13th century. The waka, commanded by Hoturoa, explored both coasts of the central North Island before making its final landf ...

  6. teara.govt.nz

    Pākehā impact

    domain extended well beyond Waikato. Mountains named as territory markers included Mt Taranaki, Tararua ... of the markers. Some chiefs realised that Māori would have to unite to keep their land, customs and ... in Waikato Next morning British soldiers, supported by colonial troops, crossed the boundary set by ...

  7. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    Land, climate and vegetation Taranaki region projects into the Tasman Sea on the west coast of New Zealand’s North Island. The region is dominated by the 2,518-metre, cone-shaped volcanic peak of Mt Taranaki (Mt Egmont), often dramatically capped with sno ...

  8. teara.govt.nz

    Seismic activity in New Zealand

    New Zealand’s earthquakes originate from the collision between the Australian and Pacific plates. Where two plates meet New Zealand is the visible part of a largely submerged small continent. The islands New Zealanders live on are the continent’s highland ...

  9. teara.govt.nz

    Overview

    Landscape The King Country is located in the North Island’s western uplands. It is flanked by mountain ranges to the west and east, and its landforms are strongly influenced by the active volcanic zone of the central North Island. The lowlands of the nort ...

  10. teara.govt.nz

    Landscape and climate

    Ranges and hills The King Country is a broad expanse of uplifted sedimentary rock west of the North Island main divide and central volcanic zone. An area of steep, rolling hills and valleys dissected by rivers and streams, it is part of a larger, geologic ...

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