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Outcomes questionnaire

Cultural Sector Regeneration Fund Outcomes Questionnaire

This webpage will help you to:

  • understand the Fund outcomes
  • self-assess your initiative’s contribution to the Fund outcomes using the Outcomes Questionnaire.

We strongly recommend that you use the Outcomes Questionnaire to self-assess your initiative before you start the online application process. The contents of this page are also available in interactive PDF and Word versions:

For more details about the fund process read the Information for Applicants Guide

Contents


The Fund has five outcomes

The Cultural Sector Regeneration Fund is designed to support strategic initiatives that contribute to the Fund outcomes and have lasting benefit for arts, culture, and heritage in Aotearoa New Zealand.

The fund outcomes are:

  • Improved sustainability and resilience of the arts, culture and heritage sectors
  • Improved safeguarding of Mātauranga Māori and support of Toi Māori
  • Improved access and participation in arts, culture and heritage sectors
  • Increased use of arts, culture and heritage as a tool to improve wellbeing
  • Increased employment and skill development opportunities

Initiatives that do not contribute strongly to the outcomes and make an enduring difference for organisations and people within the arts, culture and heritage sectors are unlikely to receive funding.


How the Outcomes Questionnaire works

There are 16 questions across five outcome areas. Consider each question and select the answer that best describes how your initiative contributes.
Your initiative doesn’t need to contribute to all five outcomes. However, initiatives that do not demonstrate a strong or moderate contribution to two or more of the outcomes are unlikely to receive funding.

As a general guide:

  • Strong contribution to one of the Fund outcomes: all A or B responses to the questions for that outcome.
  • Moderate contribution to one of the Fund outcomes: mainly B or C responses to the questions for that outcome.
  • Low contribution to one of the Fund outcomes: mainly D, E or N/A responses to the questions for that outcome.

What to do after you’ve completed this questionnaire

If your answers to this questionnaire show your initiative contributes strongly to the Fund outcomes, you can start the application process.

To apply, you must submit your Expression of Interest, including the Outcomes Questionnaire, on the online portal between Wednesday 27 July and Wednesday 7 September 2022.

Once you’ve submitted your Expression of Interest, we’ll contact you to arrange a discussion.


The questions to answer

Respond to the questions with the option most relevant to your initiative. You should have a high level of certainty that your initiative will achieve the expected benefits as you may be asked for evidence to support your assessment.

Outcome one: Improved sustainability and resilience of the arts, culture and heritage sectors

We want to support initiatives that:

  • have wide reach within the arts, culture and/or heritage sectors
  • make a real difference to sustainability and capability of the sector
  • have strong support from the sector.

1. What reach does your initiative have?

This question explores how widely the initiative’s benefits will be felt by people and organisations in the arts, culture and heritage sectors. For example, will your initiative benefit the arts sector across Aotearoa New Zealand, people and organisations within a specific sector (for example performing arts or toi whakairo), or will it mainly benefit your organisation or a small community group.

  1. Nationwide / cross sector
  2. District / regional system or sector
  3. Large collective / community / sub-sector
  4. Small collective / town
  5. Organisation / Community group

2. To what extent will your initiative increase sustainability and capability?

This question explores how much of a difference your initiative will make to the sustainability and capability of those it will reach. For example, your initiative might provide new tools that enable a large collective of arts organisations to generate the revenue they need to be sustainable long-term. Or your initiative might enable a small collective of theatres to increase audiences by 10% over the next year, or assist an iwi to upskill some of its members in whaikōrero.

  1. Significant shift over the long-term
  2. Moderate shift over the long-term
  3. Significant shift over short to medium term
  4. Moderate shift over short to medium term
  5. Minor shift

3. What level of support does your initiative have?

This question explores the level of support your initiative has from the people and organisations that are expected to benefit. This could include recognised representatives of this group. For example, an initiative might be strongly supported by a small collective of arts organisations who have been fully involved in the design and development.

  1. Strong support – including full involvement of people who will benefit
  2. Well supported – including strong involvement of people who will benefit
  3. Supported – including representation of people who will benefit
  4. Some support – including engagement of people who will benefit
  5. Limited support outside of organisation

Outcome two: Improved safeguarding of Mātauranga Māori and/or support of Toi Māori

We want to support kaupapa led by Kaitiaki (custodians) and Ringatoi Māori (practitioners), for and on behalf of iwi, hapū, hapori Māori, to safeguard their vulnerable Mātauranga through initiatives that strengthen Taonga Tuku Iho and Toi Māori infrastructure – including people, places, systems and tools.

4. Ko Wai? Who is leading the initiative?

This question explores the degree to which the appropriate Kaitiaki or Ringatoi Māori are involved in the initiative.

  1. Led by Kaitiaki, Ringatoi Māori who have tino rangatiratanga over Taonga
  2. Kaitiaki, Ringatoi Māori are in governance roles, significant involvement and support
  3. Kaitiaki, Ringatoi Māori are actively involved in the delivery of the initiative
  4. Māori-advised
  5. Delivered on behalf of Māori

5. Te Puna Mātauranga? How vulnerable is the Mātauranga Māori involved in your initiative?

This question explores the vulnerability of the Mātauranga Māori that is involved in your Taonga Tuku Iho or Toi Māori initiative. For the purposes of this fund, ‘Extremely vulnerable’ is where there are very few Kaitiaki, Pūkenga, Kaumātua, Tohunga who hold the Mātauranga. ‘Low vulnerability’ is where the Mātauranga is held by many and widely available and is therefore considered secure.

  1. Extremely vulnerable
  2. Highly vulnerable
  3. Vulnerable
  4. Some vulnerability
  5. Low vulnerability

6. Ki hea? To what degree does your initiative strengthen and sustain Taonga Tuku Iho and Toi Māori Infrastructure?

This question explores the level of sustainability and impact of your initiative on the strengthening of Taonga Tuku Iho and Toi Māori Infrastructure (people, places, systems and tools). For example, recognised Pūkenga supported to train the next generation of practitioners in an endangered artform or a cultural mapping project to record the kōrero associated with wāhi tūpuna may result in a significant long-term impact. Ringatoi upskilled in e-commerce may have a medium-term impact.

  1. Significant long-term impact.
  2. Significant medium-term impact.
  3. Some medium-term impact.
  4. Short-term impact.
  5. Limited impact.

Outcome three: Improved access and participation in the arts, culture and heritage sectors

We want to support initiatives that:

  • grow audiences
  • address barriers to access and participation
  • represent and engage more New Zealanders in arts, culture and heritage.

Participation is about enabling people to engage in the creation, development and/or delivery of arts, culture and heritage. Access is about enabling people to attend, experience or view arts, culture and heritage.

7. How many people will be supported to participate in arts, culture and heritage?

This question explores how many people, who currently experience barriers to participating in the arts, culture and heritage, will be able to actively and meaningfully participate because of your initiative.

  1. More than 100
  2. 50 - 99
  3. 25 - 49
  4. 10 - 24
  5. Less than 10

8. How significant will the impact be on participation?

This question explores how significant your initiative will be in benefitting those who will be supported to participate. It considers how significant the barrier is, how much the initiative can reduce or remove the barriers, and how long the change will be maintained.

  1. Significant, sustained change
  2. Significant change lasting the life of initiative
  3. Moderate, sustained change
  4. Moderate change lasting the life of initiative
  5. One off / short term change

9. How many people will be able to access arts, culture and heritage?

This question explores how many people, who currently experience barriers to accessing arts, culture and heritage, will be able to have meaningful access because of the initiative.

Examples of things to help people overcome barriers might be lowering ticket prices; including sign language interpretation in digital media; or providing free transport to help children in rural areas to visit heritage sites.

  1. More than 1000
  2. 500 - 999
  3. 100 - 499
  4. 10 - 99
  5. Fewer than 10

10. How significant will the impact be on access?

This question explores how significant your initiative will be for access. It considers how significant the barrier being addressed is, how much your initiative will be able to reduce or remove the barriers, and how long the change will be maintained.

  1. Significant, sustained change
  2. Significant change lasting the life of initiative
  3. Moderate, sustained change
  4. Moderate change lasting the life of initiative
  5. One off / short term change

Outcome four: Increased use of arts, culture and heritage as a tool to improve wellbeing

We want to support initiatives that use arts, culture, and heritage to provide wellbeing outcomes for New Zealanders, and strengthen the arts culture and heritage sector’s ability to deliver wellbeing initiatives in the future.

We are using the broad wellbeing domains in the Treasury Living Standards Framework.  

11. How many people will have improved wellbeing because of your initiative?

This question explores the scale and impact of your initiative by understanding the number of people who are expected to benefit from your initiative. For example, your initiative might support 20 people to spend more time doing what they love over the coming years or help hundreds of people to enjoy a show.

  1. More than 1000
  2. 500 - 999
  3. 100 - 499
  4. 10 - 99
  5. Fewer than 10

12. What is the depth of wellbeing benefits resulting from your initiative?

This question explores the improvement in wellbeing that will be achieved for those who are expected to benefit, and how long the improvement will be sustained. For example, people who spend more time doing what they love over years are likely to experience a significant and sustained improvement in wellbeing, whereas people enjoying a show will experience a short-term wellbeing benefit.

  1. Significant and sustained improvement in wellbeing
  2. Significant increases in wellbeing - with medium-term benefits
  3. Moderate increases in wellbeing - with medium-term benefits
  4. Minor increases in wellbeing - with short to medium-term benefits
  5. Short-term wellbeing benefits

Outcome five: Increased employment and skill development opportunities

We want to support initiatives that will create new and sustainable jobs. We also want to support initiatives that help people in the sector to develop the skills they need to be successful and achieve their goals.

13. How many jobs will be created?

This question explores the number of jobs in the arts, culture and heritage sectors that will be involved in the delivery of your initiative, as well as jobs that will potentially be created because of the initiative.

Please include all jobs – even if they are short-term or part-time.

  1. More than 100
  2. Up to 100
  3. Up to 50
  4. Up to 25
  5. Up to 10

14. What kind of jobs will be created?

This question explores the sorts of jobs that will be created by the initiative – whether they are new or existing, or short and long-term.

  1. Mostly new sustainable jobs (years)
  2. Mostly new medium-term jobs (months)
  3. Extends existing jobs, medium term / sustainably (months / years)
  4. Mostly new short term (days/weeks)
  5. Extends existing jobs short-term (days/weeks)

15. How many people will develop their skills?

This question explores the number of people who will develop skills because of your initiative. This might include on the job learning, targeted training opportunities, or other capability building opportunities.

  1. More than 1000
  2. 500 - 999
  3. 100 - 499
  4. 10 - 99
  5. Fewer than 10

16. What impact will your initiative have on skills?

This question explores the breadth and depth of the training your initiative will deliver, and how sustainable the change is that should result from the training. 

For example, will your initiative deliver in-depth skills development across a broad range of topics – will it lead to a significant and sustained increase in attendee’s skills? Or will it provide high-level learning that will enhance an attendee’s understanding of the relevant topic?

  1. Broad, in-depth learning - sustained change.
  2. Focussed, in depth learning - sustained change
  3. Learning which builds moderate skills and understanding of a topic
  4. Broad high-level learning - enhanced understanding of a range of topics
  5. Focussed high level learning -enhanced understanding of topic

Self-assessment

Assess youself by recording your answers to the 16 questions above. For each outcome note how you answered the related questions.

Outcome 1: Improved sustainability and resilience of the arts, culture and heritage sectors (questions 1-3)

Outcome 2: Improved safeguarding of Mātauranga Māori and/or support of Toi Māori (questions 4-6)

Outcome 3: Improved access and participation in arts, culture and heritage (questions 7-10)

Outcome 4: Increased use of arts, culture and heritage as a tool to improve wellbeing (questions 11-12)

Outcome 5: Increased employment and skill development opportunities (questions 13-16).

Once you have answered all of the questions, you will be able to identify the strength of your initiative’s contribution to each outcome by considering:

  • Strong contribution to fund outcome: all A or B responses to the questions against an outcome
  • Moderate contribution to fund outcome: mainly B or C responses to the questions against an outcome
  • Low contribution to fund outcome: mainly D or E or N/A responses to the questions against an outcome

Your initiative doesn’t need to contribute to all five outcomes; however, initiatives that do not demonstrate a strong or moderate contribution in two or more of the outcome areas are unlikely to receive funding.


Key terms and definitions

Access

Access is about enabling people to attend, experience or view arts, culture and heritage.

Capability

Capability is about the systems, support, or other activities that improve practitioner and/or organisational opportunities and administrative performance (not arts practice). 

Cross-sector

Cross-sector means there are cross over benefits for different sectors in the industry. For example there are benefits for music, film and dance.

Cultural sector

The cultural sector includes arts, culture and heritage practitioners and organisations who contribute to creating, presenting, protecting, and distributing arts, culture, and heritage.

News content and sports are not included in the cultural sector for this funding as they are supported by other programmes administered by Manatū Taonga and Sport NZ. 

Hapori Māori

A Māori community, organisation, network or group.

Kaitiaki

Custodians of knowledge, taonga and places. A person or group that has authority over Mātauranga, taonga and wāhi.

Mātauranga

A modern term that encapsulates all forms of Māori knowledge.

Participation

Participation is about enabling people to engage in creating, developing or delivering arts, culture and heritage.

Resilient or resilience

The ability to respond to changing circumstances, harmful shocks and taking advantage of opportunities across the sector.

Significant

The result of doing something that has or is likely to have important influence or effect. The change is noticeably very large and important, and evidence illustrates the significance.

Skills

The knowledge acquired to understand and use systems.

Strategic initiative

A strategic initiative is a comprehensive plan that an organization sets out to achieve its strategic goals or long-term visions to improve.

Sub-sector

A sub-sector is a specific discipline within a wider sector such as rock music, theatre venues, children's authors.

Sustained or sustainable

Something is sustained or sustainable if it will continue for an extended period (several years or into the foreseeable future) or without interruption.

Cultural sector practitioners and organisations can sustain their practice financially and resourcefully. For example, maintaining a career as a practitioner.

Taonga Tuku Iho

Māori Cultural Transmission System. The passing down of heritage, culture, traditions and taonga by our ancestors through generations  

Te Puna Mātauranga

The source from which knowledge flows.

Tino Rangatiratanga over taonga

The absolute authority over artforms, arts practices and taonga.

Toi Māori

Māori art. This term refers to traditional and contemporary Māori art forms including but not limited to whakairo, raranga, and kapa haka. 

Wellbeing

How wellbeing is defined and understood is different between people and cultures. A western view of wellbeing might focus on different ‘wellbeing domains’ such as:

  • income and what we consume
  • health
  • knowledge and skills
  • cultural identity
  • safety and security
  • social connections
  • jobs
  • housing
  • environment
  • leisure
  • civic engagement and governance.

One Te Ao Māori perspective on wellbeing is put forward bv Te Whare Tapa Whā (Mason Durie 1984) who describes four dimensions of wellbeing:

  • taha tinana – physical wellbeing
  • taha hinengaro – mental wellbeing
  • taha wairua – spiritual wellbeing
  • taha whānau – family wellbeing.

Updated on 27th July 2022